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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
the state of california. they are moving to nevada, texas and other parts of the country where they are less taxed and regulated and less burdened by rules such as calorie count on the menus such as the regulations regarding home care workers, it does not make sense to start a new business here in california. and frankly that is where the taxes come from in most states they come from businesses. as the businesses flee you are going to see the tax base flee and as legislatures such as senator leno continue to pass more legislation that impedes the freedom of business and citizens to exercise their rights you are going to see them vote with their feet and leave california. >> that attorneys me as someone who wants to retire and die in california i don't want to leave the state as a economic matter i don't consider myself to be fairly taxed. i do pay a higher tax rate and i think that is fine. but the people who are successful in our society are increasingly asked asked to bear more and more of the share of the tax burden as opposed to making sure that all citizens understand that if we are goi
principal and school superintendent in nevada. richard's passion lies in advancing educational equity and opportunity for all and we are very lucky to have him here with us here in san francisco. our superintendent of schools, richard karunda >> melinda, thank you so much for that wonderful introduction. i want to welcome you all to a sunny september morning in san francisco, i hope you have your sun block and i also want to welcome home our lieutenant governor, our former mayor, gachb newsom. it's good to see you, sir. yesterday was a really powerful experience for us in san francisco. we've made a commitment that by the end of october every 6th through 12th grader in san francisco city public schools will have had the opportunity to see bully and not only view that documentary but also go through a rich can urriculum from our teachers understanding the lessons from that movie. we all know a movie in and of itself doesn't make a difference, but i will tell you, we didn't start our approach to understanding it with the movie bully. we're very proud 234 san francisco that we have h
reservation. she is piute and went to her home. where is her home? >> [inaudible] >> in earring ton nevada. we went there once and she has a beautiful house and live there is and now she is even running for the council of her tribe. laverne was going to surprise me and be here this evening, but she had an outbreak of one of her illnesses. her foot started to bleed and now she has to be on crutches for a while, so she had to turn in her plane ticket and her taxi fare, but otherwise she would have been here tonight and many of us know laverne and we would like to say a prayer that she gets better soon and can come and see us. this is for laverne. yes. please let's clap our hands for laverne. [applause] >> thank you. laverne roberts was honored here in this space two years ago. thank you laverne. and i think i can say a lot more about being indian and how much i am proud to be indian. i did work in the school district for more than 20 years, and the people that i work with they still call me up and tell me their troubles, and ask for help sometimes, but thank you very much for all of
of nevada and other surrounding states so that in the event an incident of this magnitude happens there is sufficient response personnel notified postured and deployed to keep a continuous line of assistance from the private municipal sector moving into the stricken area in san francisco to support and reconstitute those life lines across all disciplines, telecommunication, water, waste water, gas and energy. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> good afternoon. when we talk about resill yepbs and resiliency for the san francisco public works, the sfpuc not only provides those life lines to san francisco, but we also operate the hetch hetchy regional water system that supplies a great amount of water for a large part of the bay area, 2 1/2 million customers. and for a regional supplier like ourselves when resiliency comes sbat conversation you are talking about earthquakes come up already and terrorism as well and we've done a lot to put our money where our mouth is. we are right in the middle of investing 4 1/2 billion dollars in our water system. most of that is in the regional transiti
. and i represent a region that is 50 million people. california, arizona, nevada, hawaii, it's a three territories and three countries in the pacific. and i could tell you that i have moved around my region. i've been working with the hiv/aids and other communities throughout our region. do you know how many people have said to me, i got my information through san francisco? (applause) >> that is something to be really proud of. you know, i'll tell you a little bit of a personal story as we -- i move on. imagine september 16th, 1991, your young 29 year old, gay man living in washington, d.c., fulfilling your dream to be a lobbyist. and your physician calls. hi, sam. hi, herb. imagine i had hair, i had very curly hair. [laughter] >> and bill wilson has pictures of it and i know he's here. and he said, herb, i think you ought to come to my office. and i said, why? and he said, because, you know, you had some tests recently. i know, i had the flu, i came in, i did some tests. what's up? you need to come to my office. and these are the pills. and a week-and-a-half ago sunday, september 16t
in the process of building another 15,000 rooms. southern nevada recycles 100% of its wastewater. so for every gallon we put back in the colorado, we can take an additional gallon out, or we send it to reuse facilities. and we deliver it to golf courses and parks and other outside applications. man: water's about a third of our budget. that's a lot of money. the lake right over here, 24 hours ago that was in somebody's house. it's been through a treatment plant. and now it's in our lake and we're watering with it. narrator: these reuse and conservation techniques enable las vegas to exist in the desert. another important form of conservation is preventing leaks. man: every drop counts. all water systems have what they call an efficiency rating. so if you were to measure the water that goes into your system and compare it to the water that goes out, how much is unaccounted for? most states have a goal of 10%. ours is at only 5.5% right now. and we have plans to lower that to 4%. man: we actually have our entire distribution system mapped out in a computerized or electronic format. and we can lo
has growed up remarkably. it's fueled with money from the nevada silver mines and the gold rush. it's trying to be the paris of the west. now the beach is the suburbs, the we will their people lived on the bottom and the poorest people lived on the top because it was very hard getting to the top of telegraph hill. it was mostly lean-to sharks and bits of pieces of houses up here in the beginning. and a group of 20 businessmen decided that it would be better if the top of the hill remained for the public. so they put their money down and they bought four lots at the top of the hill and they gave them to the city. lily hitchcock coit died without leaving a specific use for her bequest. she left a third of her estate for the beautify indication of the city. arthur brown, noted architect in the city, wanted for a while to build a tower. he had become very interested in persian towers. it was the 1930's. it was all about machinery and sort of this amazing architecture, very powerful architecture. he convinced the rec park commission that building a tower in her memory would be the thing
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)